CRC Energy & Clean Technology ebooks update

The library has increased our CRC Netbase Energy & Clean Technology ebooks collection, by purchasing more than 200 titles from 2015-2017 to add to our existing collection (2000-14). These ebooks can be found in the Library catalogue.

You can also browse and access the ebooks on the Taylor and Francis website for the collection if you use the login option for institutions using Shibboleth – select University of Bath and United Kingdom. You will need to filter results to the 2000-2017 ebooks (over 400 titles in total).  Full text ebooks have a green tick symbol next to them. 2018 CRC press content is on our wish list.

Topics covered in the ebooks include:

  • Bio Energy
  • Business & Policy
  • Clean Technologies
  • Novel Technologies
  • Renewable Energy
  • Traditional Industries – Clean & Green Advancements

You may be interested to know that we also have full text to almost 300 CRC Water Netbase ebooks (up to and including those published in 2013), accessible via our catalogue or T&F’s website. These cover various areas of water sciences research.

The books in all these collections are ‘DRM free’ which means you can print and download as much as you like for *personal use* (NOT teaching/sharing).

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Springer ebooks update: 2018

Our Library’s ebook collections have been further enhanced this year with more than 11,000 new ebooks from the following Springer collections. These are largely frontfile additions for 2018. Additional 2018 titles will continue to be released and become available up until the end of the year.

We have also added the Chemistry and Materials archive ebooks from pre-1999, to give a full run from 1893 to present, Business and Economics ebooks for 2005-14, as well as 2016 and 2017 content for a variety of packages.*

Springer

By combining these latest ebooks with our existing Springer content, this gives us access to over 73,000 high quality scholarly ebook titles and more than 51,000 protocols. Follow the links below to search across the subject specific collections or search for individual titles by keyword on our Library catalogue:

Springer 2018

*Political Science and International Studies 2016-17, Behavioral Science and Psychology 2017, Biomedical and Life Science 2017, Education 2017, Mathematics and Statistics 2017, plus Physics and Astronomy 2017, all unlocked in 2018.

**Lecture Notes in Computer Science – we have access to the full content: 1973-2018!

Posted in biology & biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, e-books, engineering & design, management, mathematical sciences, new resources, physics, research | Leave a comment

Times Higher Education: register for online access!

THE-Logo

The Library has started a subscription to the electronic version of the THE (Times Higher Education) for the whole University. This provides unrestricted access to their news and commentary, university rankings, World Summit Series and more.

To quickly access the full content online and for free, you will need to follow the link for online access provided via the Library catalogue record. You then need to:

  1. click the red user account symbol at the top right of the web page
  2. click ‘Register’ to set up a personal THE account using your University email address
  3. enter your preferred username and password for use when logging-in to THE
  4. (Optional) select to receive newsletter(s)
  5. Click ‘Join Us’
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Enhanced Digimap access: UK maps & map data

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© Crown Copyright

On 1 August 2018 the Library renewed its Digimap subscription for the University of Bath. Digimap is an online geospatial service developed by EDINA for use in higher education. It features a broad range of maps and downloadable map data (compatible with CAD and GIS software).

If you are already a registered user, you will notice next time you enter that you will need to agree to the license terms and conditions again before resuming access. If you are not yet registered it is a great time to jump in, register and explore the resource.

Familiar users will also see that visually it has had a significant overhaul, but most importantly, we have increased access from the three core packages we have maintained for several years, to the complete set of eight:

Previously we had access to contemporary Ordnance Survey maps, Historic and Environment (land cover) maps. Now, for the first time we have gained full access to Geological, Marine, Aerial and Lidar collections!

If you have any feedback on the product please don’t hesitate to contact the Library.


digimap-cmyk

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Library Research Services Week 2018

At the beginning of July, the Library Research Services Team held a week of events to draw attention to the support we can provide researchers at different stages of the publication cycle.LRS LeafletWe held training sessions about how to present your publications record and enhance your publishing profile, a session on how to use Pure to manage your research outputs and make them open access, as well as two sessions from our research data management experts. Our University Archivist also held an open day, so both academic and support staff could get a glimpse of the treasures held in our collections. Another successful part of the week was the staffing of a stall at lunchtimes at the bottom of the Claverton Rooms stairs, and setting up a stand at the entrance of the Library.

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We definitely know this was worthwhile because every time we returned to the stalls all our guides had been taken!

Throughout the week we released a number of posts on the Library blog introducing our staff and services. If you’d like to take a look, these posts can be accessed here:

Something that we are proud of creating and intend to use in future promotional events is our Library Research Services animation which was shown across numerous university screens, in departments and communal areas, and even on the university buses!

We hope that colleagues and researchers across the University benefited from the week – indeed, for one of our training sessions we had the most ever turn up, which has got to be a good sign. We intend to the run the week every year and so hope to see you again – if not before – in 2019!


For further information about how we can help you, please get in touch:

Posted in archive & research collections, doctoral students, events, open access, postgraduates, publications, REF, research, Research Portal | Leave a comment

Surfacing our publications online

This is an update on the transition of our institutional repository from Opus (http://opus.bath.ac.uk/ ) to the Research Portal (https://researchportal.bath.ac.uk/en/ ).

Opus (Eprints) has been our open access repository since 2008, making the research articles, conference papers, theses, etc., by Bath authors available online.  Since 2012 Opus has been integrated with Pure*.  Researchers have added pUniversity of Bath Research Portalublication metadata and full text to Pure which has then been surfaced online via the Opus website.

The roll-out of the Research Portal, which includes profiles for academic authors and fingerprinting functionality (mining keywords from full text) has been completed.  The Portal also showcases our research projects, equipment and datasets.  We are now in the process of applying redirects on Opus URLs for publications to their equivalent Research Portal URL.  We expect this to be complete in the next few weeks.  After this, Opus will be decommissioned and the Research Portal will be serving our research publications to the world.

We’ve been busy redirecting harvesting sites and search engines like Google Scholar to the Research Portal.  Academics have been informed about the Research Portal, and are being encouraged to update their profiles.  Pure and the Research Portal fulfil our Open Access obligations for the REF and funders.

What does this mean for your links?

We have a commitment to preserve the full text of our research publications via our institutional repository.  All of the documents and metadata records in Opus are available from the Portal, however if you’ve been using Opus for publication lists, you will need to update your links to the equivalent Portal lists as there are no redirects set up for these.  There are RSS feeds available from browse and search results on the Portal to help.  A frequent related request we have is how to set the Portal to automatically tweet new outputs.  There are some nifty tools available for this – we’ve used IfThisThenthat to good effect but would love to hear other ideas.

For individual publication URLs, a redirect will be in place to take readers to the same output page on the Portal.  If you’re able to edit the Opus URL on your site and update this to the Portal URL, please do.

If you have any questions, please get in touch via openaccess at bath.ac.uk.

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*Pure is available for Bath users from: https://purehost.bath.ac.uk/admin/  You will need your Bath username and passsword.

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Open Access: How will we know if we’ve been successful?

To end Library Research Services week, I thought I might pose the question: ‘How will we know when – or if –  open access has been a success?’Image result for open access

For those who don’t know, open access is a publication process which enables your research to be openly and freely available to anyone, anywhere – as long as they have an internet connection.

Open access notoriously disrupts the traditional publishing process, whereby researchers sign over their papers to publishers who then put the work behind a paywall. Over recent years funding bodies, higher education institutions, researchers, and those working in the scholarly communications sector have encourage, endorsed, and even mandated open access so that it’s now, very much, a permanent fixture within the publishing sphere.

But how do we know whether the move to open access has been a success? Undoubtedly more articles than ever are being openly published. Increasingly researchers are considering it as a viable, or indeed necessary, option for publishing their research. Because the Research Councils, the Wellcome Trust, Research England (formally HEFCE), and other external funders mandate open access for certain outputs which they’ve funded, institutions are now having to monitor compliance levels. Here at Bath in the Spring my team assessed our own compliance levels and I’m happy to report that they were above average.

So yes, through compliance monitoring we can assess whether open access has been a success, at least in respect to whether researchers are choosing it as a way to publish.

The open access movement, however, is more than just about compliance levels. Open access is about the unencumbered sharing of knowledge, the development of collaborations that may have never been formed if the papers that the researchers build upon were inaccessible, and about equitable access no matter your affiliation or location. It’s also about about re-use and licencing options (see, for example, UK-Scholarly Communications Licence and the Creative Commons licencing scheme). But how do we measure whether these benefits have been realised?

collab_map

Analysis of download statistics is one way, though this approach reveals only part of the picture. In order to gauge whether open access has been of benefit to researchers – and society more broadly – we also need to start seeking out examples of where open access has directly resulted in the development of further research; where articles have been taken up by industry and other sectors to develop their own areas of specialisms; or where, for example, schools and further education institutions have made use of freely available papers in their teaching.

By identifying such examples, we can start to draw together a more comprehensive answer to the question of whether open access has been a success. If you have made use of open access articles to further your research or have examples of where your own papers have been used by others, please get in touch as we’d love to start showcasing how Bath authors are benefitting from open access!

But compliance monitoring and measuring the impact of open access is just the tip of the iceberg.

For many the hope is that the open access scholarly publishing model becomes business-as-usual. And for others, success will only be achieved once the sharing of data and peer review also become fully open.


Image result for open access

For more information about open access at Bath please contact the Open Access Team (openaccess@bath.ac.uk, ext. 5114).

 

Posted in doctoral students, impact, international, journals, open access, postgraduates, publications, REF, research, Research Portal | Leave a comment